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  • Jancis Robinson
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  • Jancis Robinson
10 Sep 2012
 

Nick has written a book, The Art of the Restaurateur,  which, via profiles of 20 top practitioners of the art of being a restaurateur (as opposed to a chef) around the world, constitutes a guide to how to run a successful restaurant - which Nick himself did in the 1980s before ill health forced him to sell L'Escargot in London's revitalised Soho.

Visitors to JancisRobinson.com can buy copies of it at 30% off by entering the coupon code FTAR001, which will bring the price down from £24.95/$39.95 to £17.47/$27.99. Be warned that when you click on the Buy now button, you should look top right to check what's in your basket. (You might also like to compare how much Amazon will charge you for the book plus delivery, depending on your location. Purple Pager Rodrigo Mainardi points out that Amazon is a cheaper option for those in Brazil, for example.)

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The people profiled, in many cases ushered into the limelight for the first time, are:

Hazel Allen, Ballymaloe, Ireland
Joe Bastianich, Del Posto and Eatalty and many more, New York
Enrico Bernardo, Il Vino, Paris
Gabriele Bertaiola, Antica Locanda Mincio, near Verona, Italy 
Michelle Garnaut, M on the Bund and Capital M, China
Trevor Gulliver, St John, London
Sam and Eddie Hart, Fino, Quo Vadis and Barrafina, London
Maguy Le Coze, Le Bernardin, New York
Des McDonald, London
Danny Meyer, Union Square Hospitality Group, New York
Drew Nieporent, Nobu, New York
Russell Norman, Polpo etc, London
Neil Perry, Rockpool etc, Australia
Gilbert Pilgram, Zuni Cafe, San Francisco
Nigel Platts-Martin, The Square etc, London
Mark Sainsbury, Moro etc, London
Juli Soller, El Bulli, Spain
Adam Tihany, designer, New York
Marie-Pierre Troisgros, Troisgros, France
Alan Yau, Hong Kong and London

For a taste of the book see How to run Le Bernardin and this related lesson on How to name a restaurant

The book featured extensively in the Financial Times last weekend, and as lead review and on the cover of last week's Economist. No greater praise...