Also spelled as Cinsaut. Widely planted throughout southern France and Corsica (where it is now being ripped out at a great rate). With its lighter skins and soft perfume it is particularly suitable for rosés and fruity, early-drinking reds, although low yields are needed to eke out much flavour. It has the advantage over Grenache of being easy to pick by machine. Cinsault is used to add perfume and fruit to wines such as Minervois and Corbières. The variety withstands drought well and has been important in North Africa, Lebanon, Israel and South Africa where it is most famous as a parent of Pinotage. In southern Italy it is known as Ottavianello.